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Sauron

Literature DictionaryTolkiens Dictionary
'The Abhorred' (in Sindarin called Gorthaur); greatest of the servants of Melkor, in his origin a Maia of Aulë. 26, 47, 52, 169, 187-8, 195-8, 206-8, 210-3, 216, 330, 333-40, 343, 346-8, 353-77 Secondborn, The The Younger Children of Ilúvatar, Men. 44
Literature DictionaryTolkiens Middle-Earth Dictionary
'The Abhorred' (in Sindarin called Gorthaur); greatest of the servants of Melkor, in his origin a Maia of Aulë. See Annatar, Artano, Aulendil.

The Second Dark Lord.
Originally a Maia of Aulë's people, Sauron was early corrupted by Melkor and became his most trusted lieutenant. In the Wars of Beleriand, Sauron was the most feared of Morgoth's servants, but after the War of Wrath and the expulsion of the first Dark Lord, Sauron rose to become the greatest enemy of Elves and Men in the Second and Third Ages.

Sauron's History Before the First Age: Sauron was one of the mightiest (perhaps the mightiest) of the Maiar, and in the beginning of days he served Aulë the Smith. From Aulë he learnt much of forging and making, knowledge that he would make use of many thousands of years later when he built the Barad-dûr and forged the One Ring.
In the earliest days, Melkor seduced Sauron and took him to his own service, and Sauron became the greatest and most trusted of his followers. While Utumno still stood in the dark north of the world, Sauron was given command of his lesser fortress of Angband. At length, the Valar assaulted Melkor and took him in chains back to Valinor, but Sauron escaped, and remained in Middle-earth.

Sauron in the First Age: While Melkor was captive in Aman, Angband was made ready for his return, and it must be assumed that Sauron had a large part in this work. After the Darkening of Valinor, Melkor returned indeed to Middle-earth, and took up his abode in Angband. Soon after, he travelled for a while into the eastern lands to seek the newly-awakened Men leaving Sauron in command of his forces once again.
Though Sauron doubtless continued his evil works in the service of his lord, we hear nothing of these for many centuries after the return of Morgoth, until the days after the Dagor Bragollach. For two years after the Dagor Bragollach itself, Finrod's tower of Minas Tirith had guarded the Pass of Sirion against Morgoth's forces. In I 457, Sauron himself came against the tower; he cast a spell of fear upon the Elves who held it, and they were slain or fled back to Finrod in Nargothrond.
Sauron then took Minas Tirith to dwell in, and watched the Pass of Sirion himself from its topmost tower. The isle on which it stood, which had been called Tol Sirion, was renamed Tol-in-Gaurhoth, the Isle of Werewolves.
After the Dagor Bragollach, the last remnant of the House of Bëor became a scattered people. Barahir, its lord, took shelter in the uplands of Dorthonion at Tarn Aeluin with his son Beren and eleven others, and was hidden for a while from Morgoth. Sauron was sent to find and destroy this desperate band of outlaws. This he did by capturing Gorlim, one of Barahir's followers, and using his sorcery he discovered the outlaws' camp, and destroyed all of Barahir's band but his son Beren.
Beren himself fled southwards through the treacherous paths of the Ered Gorgoroth, and Sauron's army of werewolves failed to capture him. Fate drove Beren into Sauron's hands eventually, though: some years later as a he travelled through the with on the Quest of the Silmaril, Sauron captured him with Finrod and their companions and imprisoned them in Tol-in-Gaurhoth.
Sauron knew nothing of Beren's quest; sensing some danger to himself or his master, he sent wolves out throughout the lands of the Elves, and meanwhile he flung Beren, Finrod and their companions into a deep pit. There they were devoured one after the other by one of his werewolves, and eventually all were lost but Beren. As the werewolf slew Finrod, though, Lúthien came upon Sauron's Isle with Huan, the Hound of Valinor. Sauron sent wolf after wolf to investigate Lúthien's song, and each was slain in turn by Huan.

(Continued in Sauron 2 - next entry).

 

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A Fisherman of th...A-Io
AO
Abbeney
Abbott, Hannah
Abyssinian Shrive...
Accidental Magic ...Accio
Acid Pops
Ackerley, Stewart
Aconite
Adanedhel
Adorn
Adrahil #1
Adrahil #2
Aduial
Adunakhôr
Adurant
Advanced Transfig...Adventures of Mar...Adûnaic
Aeglos
Aeglos (plant)
Aegnor
Aelin-uial
Aerandir
Aerin
Afterborn
Aftercomers
Afterlithe
Afteryule
Agarwaen
Agat Alterra, Jakob
Agathurush
Age Line
Age of the Enemy
Aghan
Aging Potion
Aglarond
Aglon
Agrippa
Ai, Genly
Aiglos (Aeglos)
Ailinel
Ainulindalë
Ainulindalë (Mus...Ainulindalë (Tale)
Ainur
Aiwendil
Akallabêth
Akallabêth (tale)
Alam al-Mithal
Alatar
Alatáriel
Alb
Albania
Albert Steinowitz
Alcarin (Gondor)
Alcarin (Númenor)
Alcarinquë
Alcarondas
Alchemy
Aldamir
Aldarion
Aldarion and Eren...Aldaron
Aldburg
Aldor
Aldudénië
Aldëa
Alfirin
Algund
Alkaron
Almaren
Almarian
Almiel
Alqualondë
Aman
Amandil
Amarië
Amdír
Amlach
Amlaith of Fornost
Amon Amarth
Amon Anwar
Amon Darthir
Amon Dîn
Amon Ereb
Amon Ethir
Amon Gwareth
Amon Hen
Amon Lanc
Amon Lhaw
Amon Obel
Amon Rûdh
Amon Sûl
Amon Uilos
Amor vincit omnia
Ampolirus

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